GGC 2 Hymenoptera Fall 2015

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DANIEL DE LA HOZ


Contents

Morphospecies 1

GGCDNA1.jpg


Location of collection: 33°58'50 N, 84°00'20 W

Date of collection: 09/11/2015

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity: H' = 4.207361983

Collectors: Daniel De La Hoz, Tanya Stowell, Ugochukwu Okebalama, Robert Evans, Hamza Khan, Dijon Cousins, Ja’Nae Gray

Distinguishing morphological features of Order:

▪ Body: wasp-like, often constricted between thorax and abdomen

▪ Wings: FW little larger than HW

▪ Antennae: Fairly long, usually less than 10 segments

▪ Mouthparts: chewing, always well-developed chewing mandibles

Ecological importance:Act as pollinators for flowering plants. Some wasps are parasitoids, they lay their eggs in other species eggs. They can also be major predators to other insects. Parasitic Hymenoptera are shown to be important in preserving ecological balance and maintaining biological diversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

Economic importance: Without pollinators, there will be no plant reproduction. Most plants would not be able to be pollinated and would impact cross pollinating.

Life cycle: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

Diet: Hymenoptera have a wide range of foods going from simple leaves and pine needles, to nectar (mostly bees), to predation of other insects for their larva (mostly wasps).


Morphospecies 2

GGCDNA2.jpg


Location of collection: 33°58'50 N, 84°00'20 W

Date of collection: 09/11/2015

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity: H' = 4.207361983

Collectors: Daniel De La Hoz, Tanya Stowell, Ugochukwu Okebalama, Robert Evans, Hamza Khan, Dijon Cousins, Ja’Nae Gray

Distinguishing morphological features of Order:

▪ Body: wasp-like, often constricted between thorax and abdomen

▪ Wings: FW little larger than HW

▪ Antennae: Fairly long, usually less than 10 segments

▪ Mouthparts: chewing, always well-developed chewing mandibles

Ecological importance:Act as pollinators for flowering plants. Some wasps are parasitoids, they lay their eggs in other species eggs. They can also be major predators to other insects. Parasitic Hymenoptera are shown to be important in preserving ecological balance and maintaining biological diversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

Economic importance: Without pollinators, there will be no plant reproduction. Most plants would not be able to be pollinated and would impact cross pollinating.

Life cycle: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

Diet: Hymenoptera have a wide range of foods going from simple leaves and pine needles, to nectar (mostly bees), to predation of other insects for their larva (mostly wasps).


Morphospecies 3

GGCDNA3.jpg


Location of collection: 33°58'50 N, 84°00'20 W

Date of collection: 09/11/2015

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity: H' = 4.207361983

Collectors: Daniel De La Hoz, Tanya Stowell, Ugochukwu Okebalama, Robert Evans, Hamza Khan, Dijon Cousins, Ja’Nae Gray

Distinguishing morphological features of Order:

▪ Body: wasp-like, often constricted between thorax and abdomen

▪ Wings: FW little larger than HW

▪ Antennae: Fairly long, usually less than 10 segments

▪ Mouthparts: chewing, always well-developed chewing mandibles

Ecological importance:Act as pollinators for flowering plants. Some wasps are parasitoids, they lay their eggs in other species eggs. They can also be major predators to other insects. Parasitic Hymenoptera are shown to be important in preserving ecological balance and maintaining biological diversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

Economic importance: Without pollinators, there will be no plant reproduction. Most plants would not be able to be pollinated and would impact cross pollinating.

Life cycle: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

Diet: Hymenoptera have a wide range of foods going from simple leaves and pine needles, to nectar (mostly bees), to predation of other insects for their larva (mostly wasps).


Morphospecies 4

GGCDNA4.jpg


Location of collection: 33°58'50 N, 84°00'20 W

Date of collection: 09/11/2015

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity: H' = 4.207361983

Collectors: Daniel De La Hoz, Tanya Stowell, Ugochukwu Okebalama, Robert Evans, Hamza Khan, Dijon Cousins, Ja’Nae Gray

Distinguishing morphological features of Order:

▪ Body: wasp-like, often constricted between thorax and abdomen

▪ Wings: FW little larger than HW

▪ Antennae: Fairly long, usually less than 10 segments

▪ Mouthparts: chewing, always well-developed chewing mandibles

Ecological importance:Act as pollinators for flowering plants. Some wasps are parasitoids, they lay their eggs in other species eggs. They can also be major predators to other insects. Parasitic Hymenoptera are shown to be important in preserving ecological balance and maintaining biological diversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

Economic importance: Without pollinators, there will be no plant reproduction. Most plants would not be able to be pollinated and would impact cross pollinating.

Life cycle: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

Diet: Hymenoptera have a wide range of foods going from simple leaves and pine needles, to nectar (mostly bees), to predation of other insects for their larva (mostly wasps).


Morphospecies 5

GGCDNA5.jpg


Location of collection: 33°58'50 N, 84°00'20 W

Date of collection: 09/11/2015

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity: H' = 4.207361983

Collectors: Daniel De La Hoz, Tanya Stowell, Ugochukwu Okebalama, Robert Evans, Hamza Khan, Dijon Cousins, Ja’Nae Gray

Distinguishing morphological features of Order:

▪ Body: wasp-like, often constricted between thorax and abdomen

▪ Wings: FW little larger than HW

▪ Antennae: Fairly long, usually less than 10 segments

▪ Mouthparts: chewing, always well-developed chewing mandibles

Ecological importance:Act as pollinators for flowering plants. Some wasps are parasitoids, they lay their eggs in other species eggs. They can also be major predators to other insects. Parasitic Hymenoptera are shown to be important in preserving ecological balance and maintaining biological diversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

Economic importance: Without pollinators, there will be no plant reproduction. Most plants would not be able to be pollinated and would impact cross pollinating.

Life cycle: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

Diet: Hymenoptera have a wide range of foods going from simple leaves and pine needles, to nectar (mostly bees), to predation of other insects for their larva (mostly wasps).


CREATOR


This page was created by Daniel De La Hoz

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