GGC 3 Lepidoptera Fall 2015

From GGCWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Morphospecies 1

Location of collection: (33°59′03.87″ N, 84°00′20.37″ W)

Date of collection:

  • Aug 23, 2015

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity:

Photo:

Lepidoptera GGC site 3 Morpho 1 Robert Evans.jpg


Distinguishing morphological features of Order:

  • Two pairs of wings, with small scales that are modified hairs covering them
  • Large compound eyes
  • Long antennae
  • Larvae have chewing mouthparts, adults have either no mouthparts or a long proboscis to siphon liquids
  • Many moths are colored to be camouflaged, while butterflies may be brightly colored
  • They have complete, or holometabolous, metamorphis
  • There are about 140,000 species of Leptidopterans that are well studied across the globe

Ecological Importance:

  • The ecological importance of lepidoptera is enormous, not only because of the high percentage of species and biomass they account for in ecosystems, but also because they act as herbivores, pollinators, and food for insectivores.

Economic/agricultural/human health importance:

  • The larvae of these insects are more destructive to agricultural crops and forest trees than any other group of insects.

Morphospecies 2

Location of collection: (33°59′03.87″ N, 84°00′20.37″ W)

Date of collection:

  • Aug 23, 2015

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity:

Photo:

Lepidoptera GGC site 3 Morpho 2 Robert Evans.jpg


Distinguishing morphological features of Order:

  • Their wings are large, membranous, and have scales.
  • The front wings are longer than the hind wings.
  • They have mouthparts for sucking that are coiled.
  • The antennas are long and slender.

Ecological Importance:

  • The ecological importance of lepidoptera is enormous, not only because of the high percentage of species and biomass they account for in ecosystems, but also because they act as herbivores, pollinators, and food for insectivores.

Economic/agricultural/human health importance:

  • The larvae of these insects are more destructive to agricultural crops and forest trees than any other group of insects.

Creator

This page was created by Robert Evans

Personal tools