GGC Aulelia Morris Summer 2017

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Hymenoptera

Family: Formicidae

Common Name: Carpenter Ant



Photo

Carpenter Ant.jpg

Location of collection: (33°59′03.87″ N, 84°00′20.37″ W)

Date of collection: Summer 2017

Collection Method: Malaise trap

Order: Hymenoptera

H': 4.83

Morphospecies: 16

Rank Abundance: 4

Distinguishing Features: Largest ant species found in the south east. All ant species have a dorsal hump between thorax and abdomen, making it easy to distinguish them from wasps. Carpenter ants can come in a variety of colors: tan, black, and red. The reproductive females will have wings as well.

Habitat: Carpenter ant species reside both outdoors and indoors in moist, decaying, or hollow wood, most commonly in forest environments. They cut galleries into the wood grain to provide passageways for movement from section to section of the nest. Certain parts of a house, such as around and under windows, roof eaves, decks and porches, are more likely to be infested by carpenter ants because these areas are most vulnerable to moisture.

Ecological Importance: Most of this species are considered pests by humans because of the damage that they can inflict on property structures. Carpenter ants are foragers and will typically eat parts of dead insects. They will also eat the entrails left behind from aphid species. The tending to the aphids can increase aphid survival. Wolbachia infections can also take place in this species.



Hymenoptera

Family: Apidae

Common Name: Bumble bee



Photo

Aulelia Morris Hymen 1.jpg

Location of collection: (33°59′03.87″ N, 84°00′20.37″ W)

Date of collection: Summer 2017

Collection Method: Malaise trap

Order: Hymenoptera

H': 4.83

Morphospecies: 1

Rank Abundance: 54

Distinguishing Features: Large bee with black and yellow markings. Typically they are robust and hairy. Stinger on queen and worker bees do not contain barbs, so they can repeatedly sting if threatened.

Habitat: Bumble bees are found in temperate climates typically only in the Northern Hemisphere. They nest in the ground, often using an abandoned mouse hole.

Ecological Importance: Bumble bees are pollinating insects are are vitally important to the surrounding ecosystem. They feed on nectar and while feeding there is a transfer of pollen. Because of this pollination conservation efforts have been put in place to protect the bees when their numbers began declining. It is important to note that because Bumble bees do not over winter in their nests, they do not stock pile honey are not good producers for making honey. Any the natural pollinator for crops and wildflowers, many commercial farming entities will have bee boxes or nests on site as plants that have been pollinated have a higher yield in produce. Bumble bees can even pollinate tomato plants inside of greenhouses, where many other pollinators could not.

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