GGC Dat Nguyen Summer 2017

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Dat Nguyen


Coleoptera 10

Family: Mordellidae

DATBUGGY.jpeg


Location of collection: 33°58'50 N, 84°00'20 W

Date of collection: 05/25/2017

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity: H' = 3.417245712

Rank abundance: 4


Collectors: Dat Nguyen, Jasmine Redmond, Alex Dolinski, Mariah Bell

Distinguishing morphological features of Family:

▪ Body: humpbacked, wedge shape

▪ Head: bent down, situated ventrally

▪ Antennae: short, threadlike, serrate, or clubbed

▪ Tarsi: 5-5-4. 1.5-15.0 (usually 3-7) mm

Ecological importance: These beetles are common on flowers, especially the composites. They are quite active and run or fly quickly when disturbed. Their common name is derived from the tumbling movements they make in attempting to escape capture.

Economic importance: The larvae live in decaying wood and in plant pith. Some are predaceous.

Hymenoptera 10

Group: Hymenoptera

DATBUGGY 2.jpeg


Location of collection: 33°58'50 N, 84°00'20 W

Date of collection: 05/25/2017

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity: H' = 3.417245712


Collectors: Dat Nguyen, Jasmine Redmond, Alex Dolinski, Mariah Bell

Distinguishing morphological features of Group:

▪ Wings: Two pairs of membranous wings, some may be wingless.

▪ Body: Constriction between the first 2 segments of the abdomen.

▪ Mouth: Chewing mandibuate mouthparts, although in some species such as bees the lower lip is modified to form a tongue.

▪ Eyes: Compound eyes, usually large

Ecological importance: Hymenopterans are found in nearly all terrestrial habitats throughout Australia and may occur in soil, leaf litter and a range of vegetation types, especially flowers. Some species are often observed drinking at the edges of water or gathering mud that is used to construct nests, often in man-made environments.

Economic importance: Although some species are regarded as pests (e.g., sawflies, gall wasps, and some ants), most members of the Hymenoptera are extremely beneficial -- either as natural enemies of insect pests (parasitic wasps) or as pollinators of flowering plants (bees and wasps).

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