Quercus alba 2016

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Contents

Latin Name

Quercus alba

Common Name

White Oak

Description

White oak.jpg

source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_alba

Leaf Description

Alternate, five to nine inches long, three to four inches wide. Obovate or oblong, seven to nine-lobed, usually seven-lobed with rounded lobes and rounded sinuses; lobes destitute of bristles; sinuses sometimes deep, sometimes sha

Leaf Photo

Leaf pic.jpg

source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_alba

Flower Description

Alternate, five to nine inches long, three to four inches wide. Obovate or oblong, seven to nine-lobed, usually seven-lobed with rounded lobes and rounded sinuses; lobes destitute of bristles; sinuses sometimes deep, sometimes shallow

Seed Description

Alternate, five to nine inches long, three to four inches wide. Obovate or oblong, seven to nine-lobed, usually seven-lobed with rounded lobes and rounded sinuses; lobes destitute of bristles; sinuses sometimes deep, sometimes shallow

Bark/Stem Description

Bark pic.jpg

source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_alba

Other Information

Although found on many soil types, white oak does best on coarse, deep, moist, well-drained, with medium fertility, and slightly acid soils. It is well adapted to heavy soils and north and east-facing slopes. Natural stands are often found in areas with loam and clay soil. White oak is moderately resistant to ice breakage, sensitive to flooding, and resistant to salt spray and brief salt-water submergence. It is sensitive to fire injury, coal smoke, and fly ash deposit on soil surface

Distinguishing Characteristics

White oak acorns are oval; about a quarter of the acorn body is covered with a cap which drops off at maturity


Collection Location on GGC’s Campus

This was located in the forest, next to the baseball field, across Lonnie Harvel Blvd

Habitat

It is fairly tolerant of a variety of habitats, and may be found on ridges, in valleys, and in between, in dry and moist habitats, and in moderately acid and alkaline soils. It is mainly a lowland tree, but reaches altitudes of 5,249ft in the Appalachian Mountains. It is often a component of the forest canopy in an oak-heath forest

Historic Range

It grows from Maine to Minnesota southward to Florida and Texas

Range Map

Range map pic.png

source:http://na.fs.fed.us/pubs/silvics_manual/volume_2/quercus/alba.htm

Cultural Information

Timber: White oak’s wood is strong and durable for staves for barrels, lumber, flooring, and interior woodwork. Recreation and Beautification: White oak is an excellent ornamental tree because of its broad round crown, dense foliage, and purplish-red to violet-purple fall color.


This page was created by:

Timothy Berry

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