Specimen 348: Richard Piercy and Travis Jones

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Contents

Biodiversity Project Information

Location of Collection

GGC3

Date of Collection

November 2012

Shannon-Wiener Index of Biodiversity

H'= 3.95

Scientific Classification

Aranea

Sub-order

Not Identified

Family

Not Identified

Genus

Not Identified

Species

Not Identified

Description

Distinguishing Morphological Features of Order

Mites are arachnids and, as such, evolved from a segmented body with the segments organised into two tagmata: a prosoma (cephalothorax) and an opisthosoma (abdomen). However, only the faintest traces of primary segmentation remain in mites; the prosoma and opisthosoma are insensibly fused, and a region of flexible cuticle (the cirumcapitular furrow) separates the chelicerae and pedipalps from the rest of the body.

This anterior body region is called the capitulum or gnathosoma and, according to some workers, is also found in Ricinulei. The remainder of the body is called the idiosoma and is unique to mites. Most adult mites have four pairs of legs, like other arachnids, but some have fewer. For example, gall mites like Phyllocoptes variabilis (family Eriophyidae) have a worm-like body with only two pairs of legs; some parasitic mites have only one or three pairs of legs in the adult stage. Larval and prelarval stages have a maximum of three pairs of legs; adult mites with only three pairs of legs may be called 'larviform'.

The mouth parts of mites may be adapted for biting, stinging, sawing or sucking. They breathe through tracheae, stigmata (small openings of the skin), intestines and the skin itself. Species hunting for other mites have very acute senses, but many mites are eyeless. The central eyes of arachnids are always missing, or they are fused into a single eye. Thus, any eye number from none to five may occur.

Geographical Distribution

They live in practically every habitat, and include aquatic (freshwater and sea water) and terrestrial species. They outnumber other arthropods in the soil organic matter and detritus. Many are parasitic, and they affect both vertebrates and invertebrates. Most parasitic forms are external parasites, while the free living forms are generally predatory and may even be used to control undesirable arthropods. Others are detritivores that help to break down forest litter and dead organic matter such as skin cells. Others still are plant feeders and may damage crops.

Life Cycle

Acarine ontogeny typically consists of an egg, a prelarval stage (often absent), a larval stage (hexapod except in Eriophyoidea which have only two pairs of legs), and a series of nymphal stages. Any or all of these stages except the adult may be suppressed or occur only within the body of a previous stage. Larvae (and prelarvae) have a maximum of three pairs of legs (legs are often reduced to stubs or absent in prelarvae); legs IV are added at the first nymphal stage. Usually a maximum of three nymphal stages are present and they are referred to in sequence as protonymph, deutonymph, and tritonymph; however, some soft ticks have supernumerary nymphal stages. The females of some Tarsonemidae bear sexually mature young. If one or more nymphal stages are absent, then authors may disagree on which stages are present. Only the Oribatida pass through all developmental stages.

Sexual Dimorphism

Both males and females are present in most species.

Ecological Importance

An unquantified, but major positive contribution of the Acari is their normal functioning in ecosystems, especially their roles in the decomposer subsystem.

Economic/Agricultural/Human Health Importance

Damage to crops is perhaps the most costly economic effect of mites, especially by the spider mites and their relatives (Tetranychoidea), earth mites (Penthaleidae), thread-footed mites (Tarsonemidae) and the gall and rust mites (Eriophyidae). Some parasitic forms affect humans and other mammals, causing damage by their feeding, and can even be vectors of diseases such as scrub typhus, rickettsialpox, Lyme disease, Q fever, Colorado tick fever, tularemia, tick-borne relapsing fever, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis and tick-borne meningoencephalitis. A well known effect of mites on humans is their role as an allergen and the stimulation of asthma in people affected by respiratory disease.

The use of predatory mites (e.g., Phytoseiidae) in pest control and herbivorous mites that infest weeds are also of importance.

PCR Product

None.

Sequence Data

No Data.

Return to the Aranea Spring 2013 page.

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